Curiosity Findings

.

1. The Henselt Library  LINK      

Public domain scores of rare nineteenth-century piano music.

The Henselt Library houses over 2,000 rare scores of nineteenth-century piano music, many of which are not generally available elsewhere. As an online library, it is committed to the principle of making this key archive material publically available for download free of charge using easily available file formats.

  The Henselt Library consists of public domain scores that are mostly for piano 2 hands, with a small number of concerto scores and reductions. Both original works and transcriptions are represented, ranging from miniatures and salon pieces to major sonatas and extended tone-pictures. This variety reflects the importance of the piano in both public concert life and in more intimate surroundings.

  The nineteenth-century is the key point in the growth of the piano both as an expanded and strengthened instrument and in terms of its increased repertoire responding to the rise of the virtuoso and the popularity of the piano as a domestic instrument. The Henselt Library offers an opportunity to experience this period through many worthwhile but forgotten works.

  All of the music is “rare” in the sense that the majority is both unknown today and extremely difficult to obtain, and in many cases remains unrecorded and unperformed. It has been made available in the Library thanks to the dedicated work of many enthusiasts around the world who have shared a commitment to the open distribution of nineteenth-century music.

The Henselt Library houses over 2,000 rare scores of nineteenth-century piano music, many of which are not generally available elsewhere. As an online library, it is committed to the principle of making this key archive material publically available for download free of charge using easily available file formats.  The Henselt Library consists of public domain scores that are mostly for piano 2 hands, with a small number of concerto scores and reductions. Both original works and transcriptions are represented, ranging from miniatures and salon pieces to major sonatas and extended tone-pictures. This variety reflects the importance of the piano in both public concert life and in more intimate surroundings.  The nineteenth-century is the key point in the growth of the piano both as an expanded and strengthened instrument and in terms of its increased repertoire responding to the rise of the virtuoso and the popularity of the piano as a domestic instrument. The Henselt Library offers an opportunity to experience this period through many worthwhile but forgotten works.  All of the music is “rare” in the sense that the majority is both unknown today and extremely difficult to obtain, and in many cases remains unrecorded and unperformed. It has been made available in the Library thanks to the dedicated work of many enthusiasts around the world who have shared a commitment to the open distribution of nineteenth-century music.

.

.

.

2. Where to buy BASURIES, East Indian Bamboo Traverse Flute, and which Bansureis I am performing on?  LINK    

Musician's Mall - Formerly the Ali Akbar College Store - 2111 Channing Way Berkeley, CA 94704

Three songs on my CD LONGING are recorded with a BANSURI. Track Tr1 and Tr5 E-Bansuri (~$230, 30" long),  Tr3 is played with the F-Bansuri (~$200, 28" long) performing scale is in a Phrygish.

Here is a link to AMAZON with the same E (lowest tone B) Bansuri flute I am performing on LINK-AMAZON-E-BANSURI  (~$85-$95). The E-Bansuri is the traditional pitch of the "Classical East Indian" music. For functional music any pitch of Bansuri will do, but for more traditional tunes and meditation music, I recommend the E-Bass-Bansuri. The East Indian music seams to be pitch in C# minor, which is the traditional tuning of the Tambura (listen to it at Youtube), Tablas and Sitar. Some long time ago I had a book called "Die Cosmische Oktave," and in this book the author made the case that C# is the frequency of the sun, and that is the reason the Indians tune there instruments to the sun energy instead to the A, the earth energy. I do not know how he came to it, but it sounded right at that time.

Here a LINK to more info about East Indian Tuning: (A sitar can be tuned a variety of ways and can be tuned to different keys usually from B to D. A fairly standard tuning is the key of C; however, certain performers such as Ravi Shankar tune their sitars to C#. Also note that various ragas demand that the sitar be re-tuned to a different key. For most beginners, especially westerners, it is recommended to start out with the key of C. )  

.

.

3. My Personal thoughts about A-432HZ vs A-440HZ: 

.

Introduction:

    The main reason I am commenting on this in a written manner is, because I am getting asked, if I am playing in A-432HZ or A-440HZ! This is a new development and Odell at High Spirts is selling now a new line called "Earth Tone© 432Hz."  

    While researching more facts and details I discovered that this new NEW-AGE trend is emotional charged, very similar like in Politics, Flat-Earth or UFO's and lines in the sky. To be very clear, I do tune my instruments to 440HZ! The main reason is to match all my instruments, which means to play in tune!

    With today's sound editing software it is very fast and easy to pitch-down any song recorded in 440HZ to 432HZ or any other pitch you would like. Long time ago when using tape players and turntables, you may have not at all ever listen to the correct pitch, because these mechanic reproductions of music was very imperfect and you many remember the wobbling pitches. 

    When performing music I am playing many tones covering all frequencies from 50-20000HZ. Each tone I am playing has many overtones merging with the reflections of the room. Music is a very complex event of thousand frequencies in a 3 minutes song. That is very different from the sound of one tuning fork! Music is not a single tone. When you listen to any clean sinus wave, it sounds dead, simply horrible boring, no matter if it is 432HZ or 440HZ . When listening to this sound on YouTube, did you here the difference, did you have different emotional feelings?

    I could make a lot of money to offer to pitch your favorite music from 440HZ to 432HZ, which is technically possible and I can do it. So give me a call and I will burn you CD's or upload your songs in 432HZ in exchange for my hourly wage.

.

History of Tuning:

    There are actually more than 2 well documented pitch preferences (for example: Today's Baroque instruments are tuned to 415HZ, Mozart Mozart’s A comes from an ancient tuning fork from 1780 with the tone of A=421.6 HZ and our modern orchester A440 or A4 (also known as the Stuttgart pitch)), and chances are, that there are more possibilities waiting.

    Once upon a time in old Germany I played a baroque Recorder in a "Baroque and Renaissance Trio" and our recorders were tuned to A-415HZ. Sometimes we had the chance to play with on old Wood Organ build in the 16th century which was pitch closer to A-400HZ than we liked. We had to pull out our mouthpieces very much and play significantly softer to reach down to that pitch. So why now A-432HZ?

Musicologist Alexander John Ellis LINK
   has searched, measured and documented ancient pipe organs and tuning forks. Here is a graph representing his most important findings—as you can see the only mention of 432 Hz was proposed in Italy in 1880 (by Verdi), and we already know that this was done for practical reasons rather than spiritual ones. The fact is that before standardization, the pitch of A fluctuated heavily between 400 Hz and 460 Hz.
      

    The first time “Cycles Per Second (HZ)” could be accurately measured was in 1834, when two instruments were invented: the (remodeled) Savart Wheel by Félix Savart, and the Tonometer by Johann Scheibler.

    Read the whole article to understand that there is no problem to tune to 432 HZ, but there is also no reason or gain to do so:

Music Theory: 432 Hz Tuning - Separating Fact From Fiction

.

There is not only the question of "Which Pitch?", there is also the question of "Which Temperament?" to tune in:

    As a musician preferring a certain Piano Tuner with a specific temperament (there are many different ways of temperament tuning available) tuning like "The Equal Tempered Scale," I am aware of the complexity and the effect on the emotional experience of tones, tuning and pitches. In a matter of fact, the piano is not tuned in anyway to the perfect 5th or any other perfect interval, which would make playing many songs impossible. We are tempering between mathematical correct and perfect 5th correct (In musical tuning, a temperament is a tuning system that slightly compromises the pure intervals of just intonation to meet other requirements. ... "Tempering is the process of altering the size of an interval by making it narrower or wider than pure.) We are actually stretching the lower and upper oktaves to make them sound "right" or "good." If we would not, tones would clash and sound horrible, we would think they are playing wrong.

.

The following table is from the web-side sacred-geometry.com:

It looks like a very detailed and well documented informal web-side, but see for yourself. On this side different pitches are tested and individual emotional recorded. The table shows, that when using temperament scales instead of mathematical scales, the results are not as conclusive as the 432HZ-defenders would like you to see:

 

 

  

     Numerology and scientific formulas are two different things:

    Numerology came up with many 432 situations, completely unrelated to wave-forms, frequencies and music. The number 432 seamed to be appearing in Pyramids and Plato's (or was it Socrates) mathematics and more. Indeed 432 is a very interesting number. My Mala (from Osho in India) has 108 beads, representing 108 prayers or 108 meditations and in Tantra the 108 sex positions. And my Rosary (from my Catholic past) has 53 beads, 2x53=106x4=424 (shit, that's not 432!). BUT, 4x108=432 must be a magic number. There are more scientific situations where the number 432 can come up, but it has also to be relate to HZ, not just numerology, it has to do something with the definition of HZ, and there's the the big flaw!

    The flaw is the "second," which is totally man made and accidental. The "second" is one important part of the formula which creates HZ. HZ is movement in the time-frame of one second. If we would have made the second a little longer or shorter, the number of 432 movements in a second would not at all appear! Remember, 432HZ means 432 moments in one second, that is the definition of 432-HZ! If the second changes, 432 is not your number! And the Catholic Rosary has 53 beads, why not A-424-HZ as healing? The reason the A-432 picked up is, that many people argued the magic number 432 by pushing the reality towards the given outcome. They wanted to make 432 the big magic number. So here an example how to make it 432 and not an other number:

    The earth magnetic field vibrates as a resonance of 7.83Hz and better known as the "Schumann Resonance." Now somebody rounded that up to 8HZ and divided 432 by 8 = 54 x 2 = 108 x2 =216 x 2 =432, WOW 432-HZ!!! BUT that's not how a octavation is done, it's done like this: 7.83HZ x 2 = 15.66 x 2 = 31.32 x 2 = 62.64 x 2 = 125.28 x 2 = 250.56 x 2 = 501.12HZ WOW, that's not 432HZ!?!?! Well the frequency of the earth is not 432, it's 501.12-HZ.

 

 None of this numbers are constant and/or will end up as A-432-HZ! And that's no problem, if you would like to play higher or lower or 432 HZ, just do it. But if you want to play together with other musicians, make sure they have an instrument in the same pitch, otherwise you will sound out-ot-tune.

.

.

 

 

 

 

Listen to VIBHAS CDs

NEW RELEASE

2018 !!!

 This link forwards you to my SHOP - MEDITATION CD on CD-BABY.

MEDITATION WITH SOUND BOWLS

 

This CD with Tibetan sound bowls can help deepen your meditation, be useful as a sleep meditation and help you relax after a long day as you allow the sound and vibrations to move through your body releasing tension, renewing your feeling of well-being

 

 

 

Light On The Path - Instrumental Music CD by Vibhas: Piano Solos, Native American Flute Songs and Soprano Saxophone

LIGHT ON THE PATH

 

Instrumental Music on Native American and East Indian Flutes and Piano solos

 

 

Longing - Instrumental Music CD by Vibhas: Native American Flute Songs over Piano Accompany, Latin Rhythms or Nature Sounds

LONGING

 

Instrumental Music on Native American and East Indian Flutes over Latin Rhythms

 

 

VIVA VIBHAS - Instrumental Music CD by Vibhas: Romantic and meditative Piano Solos, haunting Native American Flute Songs and smooth Latin Jazz Soprano Saxophone Songs

 VIVA VIBHAS

 

Instrumental Music on Native American Flutes, Piano solos and Soprano Saxophone songs over Latin Rhythms

 

 

Flowers of the Dawn – Devotional Songs and Chanting by Prasado (voice) and Vibhas Kendzia (all instruments)

FLOWERS OF THE DAWN

 

Voice, Native Flutes, Piano and Keyboard

Songs of love and beauty surround you… With these songs we want to capture our intimate feelings of being present to the moment. The sweet conversation between flute and voice, the play of sound and silence.

MUSIC VIDEOS





Links to my other Social Pages

Links to other web-pages

Here are some links to my videos, pictures and other social webpages you may be interested in: